Teperdexrian

The Interesting, The Strange, The News.

Posts Tagged ‘Britain

Scientists plan $1.5bn laser strong enough ‘to tear the fabric of space

leave a comment »

A laser powerful enough to tear apart the fabric of space could be built in Britain.

The major scientific project will follow in the footsteps of the Large Hadron Collider and will answer questions about the universe.

The laser will be capable of producing a beam of light so intense that it will be similar to the light the earth receives from the sun but focused on a speck smaller than a pin prick.

Extreme: A laser powerful enough to tear apart the fabric of space could be built in Britain

Extreme: A laser powerful enough to tear apart the fabric of space could be built in Britain.

Scientists say it will be so powerful they will be able to boil the very fabric of space and create a vacuum.

A vacuum fizzles with mysterious particles that come in and out of existence but the phenomenon happens so fast that no-one has ever actually been able to prove it.

It is hoped the Extreme Light Infrastructure Ultra-High Field Facility would allow scientists to prove the particles are real by pulling the vacuum fabric apart.

Scientists even believe it might help them to prove whether other dimensions actually exist.

This latest experiment will follow the footsteps of the Large Hadron Collider and be the next big scientific experiment

This latest experiment will follow the footsteps of the Large Hadron Collider and be the next big scientific experiment.

Professor John Collier, a scientific leader for the ELI project and director of the Central Laser Facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, Oxfordshire, said the laser would be the most powerful on earth.

‘At this kind of intensity we start to get into unexplored territory as it is an area of physics that we have never been before,’ he told the Sunday Telegraph.

The ELI ultra-high field laser, which will be completed by the end of the decade, will cost £1bn and the UK is among a number of European countries in the running to house it.

The European Commission has already authorised plans for three more lasers which will become prototypes for the ultra-high field laser.

Scientists hope the laser will also allow them to see how particles inside an atom behave and it is hoped it might be able to explain the mystery of why the universe contains more matter than previously detected by revealing what dark matter really is.

HOW IT WILL WORK

  • The ultra-high field laser will be made up of 10 beams – each more powerful than the prototype lasers.
  • It will produce 200 petawatts of power – more than 100,000 times the power of the world’s combined electricity production but in less than a trillionth a second.
  • The energy needed to power the laser will be stored up beforehand and then used to produce a beams several feet wide which will then be combined and eventually focused down onto a tiny spot.
  • The intensity of the beam is so powerful and will produce such extreme conditions, that do not even exist in the center of the sun.

Powerful: The ultra-high field laser will be made up of 10 beams - each more powerful than the prototypes

Powerful: The ultra-high field laser will be made up of 10 beams – each more powerful than the prototypes.

Via DailyMail

Advertisements

Extraordinary images from space shows Britain in a whole new light

leave a comment »

Twinkling brightly in a sea of lights, this is Britain as you’ve never seen her before.

An astronaut orbiting 230 miles above Earth aboard the International Space Station (ISS) took advantage of a clear night in the skies to snap this incredible photo.

The sprawling metropolises of London, Birmingham, Manchester, Newcastle and Glasgow are revealed in a dazzling spread of yellow light.

Britain by night: Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoili took this photo on a clear night while orbiting 230miles above Earth aboard the International Space Station

Britain by night: Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoili took this photo on a clear night while orbiting 230miles above Earth aboard the International Space Station.

Towns across the UK can also be seen as small patches of light, while some of the busiest motorways appear as thin, spidery lines.

The image was taken by Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli.

The 54-year-old captured the image – and others of a similar nature, including a close-up of Ireland and Northern Ireland – shortly before he left the space station for the trip back to Earth last month.

Nespoli was a crew member of Expedition 27 alongside Russian Commander Dmitry Kondratyev and Nasa astronaut Cady Coleman.

The trio began their mission with the departure of the Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft on in December 2010 and spent six months on the ISS working on microgravity experiments.

Capital close-up: London can be seen in all her glory, including the M25 ring road

Capital close-up: London can be seen in all her glory, including the M25 ring road

They landed in Kazakhstan on May 24, days before Endeavour concluded its final mission on June 1. Endeavour was on the next-to-last mission of Nasa’s 30-year space shuttle programme.

Nasa’s shuttle fleet is retiring after one last flight next month with a load of supplies for the station.

Commander Mark Kelly, Italian astronaut Roberto Vittori and Endeavour’s four other astronauts – Gregory Johnson, Michael Fincke, Greg Chamitoff and Andrew Feustel – had returned to Earth after 16 days in space of repairs at International Space Station.

The crew installed a $2billion cosmic ray detector, an extension beam and a platform full of spare parts, enough to keep the station operating in the shuttle-less decade ahead.

Belfast, Dublin and Cork are prominent in this image of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Belfast, Dublin and Cork are prominent in this image of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

The $2.2billion ship, the youngest of the shuttles with 123 million miles over 25 flights, is now bound for the California Space Center in Los Angeles.

Nasa is leaving the Earth-to-orbit business behind to focus on expedition to asteroids and Mars.
Private companies hope to pick up the slack for cargo and crew hauls to the space station.

Until then, Americans will continue hitching rides to the station aboard Russian Soyuz capsules at the cost of tens of millions of dollars a seat.

The ISS and the docked Endeavour in orbit over Earth. Nespoli's photo, taken last month, was the first taken of a shuttle docked at the ISS from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft

The ISS and the docked Endeavour in orbit over Earth. Nespoli’s photo, taken last month, was the first taken of a shuttle docked at the ISS from the perspective of a Russian Soyuz spacecraft.

 

Via DailyMail